Category Archives: Author Interviews

Shimmer #13: Interview Index

So many outstanding stories in Issue #13, and we’re treating you to a little extra content from the authors themselves!  Follow the links to read what they had to say about their Shimmer #13 stories, and the creative process. Squid and unicorns–Shimmer #13 is special.

“Bullet Oracle Instinct,” by K.M. Ferebee

“Labrusca Cognatus,” by Erik T. Johnson

“Gutted,” by L.L. Hannett

“Frosty’s Lament,” by Richard Larson

“All the Lonely People,” by E.C. Myers

“Haniver,” by J.J. Irwin

“Dogs,” by Georgina Bruce

“Barstone,” by Stephen Case

“A Window, Clear as a Mirror,” by Ferrett Steinmetz

“Four Household Tales,” by Poor Mojo’s Giant Squid

Be sure to exit through the gift shop and grab your copy of Shimmer 13 today!

Issue #13: J.J. Irwin on “Haniver”

” ‘Haniver’ started life as my week-four story at Clarion South. Our tutor for the week was Gardener Dozois, and I wanted to write something closer to the science fiction end of the spec fic spectrum.” Read J.J. Irwin’s entire Shimmer interview, and then listen to a bit of “Haniver” from Shimmer #13.

“Tim Powers, Patricia McKillip, William Gibson and Terry Pratchett all got in before I started consciously extracting useful tools from other stories, so their influence runs deeper and (for want of a better phrase) more organically.”

Issue #13: L.L. Hannett, on “Gutted”

“Rain was lashing the car as we drove, the wind was chilly, the sky grey — and the husband wanted to keep his wife from temptation. I didn’t hear the rest of the stories that day. My mind was abuzz.” Read the rest of L.L. Hannett’s Shimmer interview!

L. L. Hannett reads from “Gutted,” her Shimmer #13 story.

“…my stories do come as images. The process of writing becomes like looking at a series of paintings, and trying to imagine what the figures in the tableaux are feeling, what they smell and taste, what they can see from their restricted positions, how the light falls on them, how they got there, and how they’re going to get between frames.”

Nicky Drayden reads “You Had Me At Rarrrgg”

Today’s the official release date for Shimmer‘s 12th issue! To celebrate, we’re kicking off our author reading series with this gem from Nicky Drayden. Her story, “You Had Me At Rarrrgg,” instantly charmed me. In the video below, read and illustrated by the author, you’ll get a taste of why.

To find out what happens next, and to read the rest of the issue, buy your copy today.

13 Lucky Questions with Mary Robinette Kowal

Mary Robinette Kowal
Mary Robinette Kowal. Photo © 2010 Annaliese Moyer

Mary Robinette Kowal, Art Director Emeritus for Shimmer, is never still for very long. She works as a professional puppeteer and voice actor, is the Vice President of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and now has her first novel gracing bookstore shelves everywhere. Mary took time out of her busy schedule to talk with Shimmer about that new novel, Shades of Milk and Honey (Tor, 2010), “the fantasy novel that Jane Austen might have written.”

1. Shades of Milk and Honey has been described as Pride and Prejudice with magic. What drew you to the Regency timeframe?

I love Jane Austen and at the time I was reading Persuasion. I wondered why no one was writing these intimate family dramas in fantasy.

2. Can you explain some about the process of selling your first book? Was this the first book you wrote and tried to sell?

This is the fourth book I’ve written and the second one I’ve tried to sell. Mostly it involves a lot of waiting. I got very lucky and have a wonderful agent who does all the hard work of actually sending it out. With the first novel, I was sending it to publishers on my own and that takes forever.

3. One of your short stories (“First Flight“) involves a time machine. If you could travel back in time to the Regency period, what would you do? Where would you go? Who would you seek out?

First of all, I’d disguise myself as a man. Ladies had better clothes but not enough freedom of movement for my taste. Since I’ll still sound like a modern American, I’ll study with an local acting teacher first to try to blend in. Once I feel comfortable there, I’ll do a tour of the continent. In particular, I’d like to see the shadow puppeteer Seraphin in Paris.

4. Did working with Shimmer and getting a behind the scenes look at how a magazine comes together impact your approach to your own fiction?

Absolutely. Reading slush helped me understand what editors mean when they say things like a story “doesn’t rise above.” There are a lot of stories that are unflawed but also not doing anything more than telling a competent story. It’s still an elusive idea, but time reading the slush pile definitely helped with that.

5. Puppetry, travel, vice president of the SFWA…how do you balance everything you do and still make time for writing?

Honestly? Structured procrastination. It’s much easier to justify putting something off if there’s another thing that is more pressing. If you manage them right, generally it’s possible to use the urge to flee to get everything done.

6. Finish the sentence: “I wish I could _____.”

I wish I could take a nap, now.

7. What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve been given? Alternatively, what’s the worst?

Kristine Kathryn Rusch said that the manuscript is the tool with which you are telling the story in your head. Sometimes, you’ve picked the wrong tool. The problem is with the manuscript and it is not a precious thing. The worst advice was to put all five senses on every single page. I wound up with a story that was incomprehensible and put my instructor, who’d told me to do that, to sleep.

8. What favorite book do you wish you could forget, so you could have the pleasure of reading it for the first time again?

The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell.

9. What was the most frustrating thing about writing Shades of Milk and Honey?

When I realized that the plot had taken a wrong turn and that I’d need to throw out 20,000 words. Bear in mind that I’m an outliner, and yet still. I needed to toss those chapters and re-outline based on what I was discovering as I was writing.

10. What do you know now that you didn’t know before the writing and publication of Shades of Milk and Honey?

The word “check” only means “stop” in 1814. So it wouldn’t be used in the sense of “I shall check on the strawberries” since that would mean “I will stop the strawberries.”

Mary's Favorite Royal
Mary's Favorite Royal

11. Among your collection, which is your favorite typewriter? Or, is there one out there that you love but haven’t yet been able to acquire?

I have a Duotone Royal that has a sans serif font. It’s a beautiful maroon and black machine. The one that I’m still looking for is the typewriter I let get away. It was a Corona #3, folding typewriter, in Oxblood red.

12. Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility?

Sense and Sensibility.

13. When can readers expect the sequel, Glamour in Glass, to hit shelves? Any sneak peeks?

It comes out in early 2012. Here are the opening lines, “There are few things in this world which can simultaneously delight and dismay in the same manner as a formal dinner party. Finding oneself a guest of honour, only increases the presentiment of unease, should one be disposed to such feelings.”

Mary Robinette Kowal, Art Director Emeritus for Shimmer, is never still for very long.

She works as a professional puppeteer and voice actor, is the Vice President of Science

Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and now has her first novel gracing bookstore

shelves everywhere. Mary took time out of her busy schedule to talk with Shimmer about

that new novel, Shades of Milk and Honey.

If you would like to catch the author and her novel in person, look for her at:

KGB Bar Fantastic Fiction, 85 E. 4th Street, New York, NY, 10003: Wednesday

August 18th, 7-8pm. SF IN SF AT VARIETY THEATER 582 Market Street @

Montgomery (1st floor of The Hobart Bldg), San Francisco, CA 94104: Saturday August

21st, 6-7pm. Tsunami Books 2585 Willamette St. Eugene, OR 97405: Tuesday August

24th, 5-6pm.

13 Lucky Questions with Mary Robinette Kowal

by E. Catherine Tobler

1. Shades of Milk and Honey has been described as Pride and Prejudice with magic.

What drew you to the Regency timeframe?

I love Jane Austen and at the time I was reading Persuasion. I wondered why no one was

writing these intimate family dramas in fantasy.

2. Can you explain some about the process of selling your first book? Was this the

first book you wrote and tried to sell?

This is the fourth book I’ve written and the second one I’ve tried to sell. Mostly it

involves a lot of waiting. I got very lucky and have a wonderful agent who does all the

hard work of actually sending it out. With the first novel, I was sending it to publishers

on my own and that takes forever.

3. One of your short stories (“First Flight”) involves a time machine. If you could

travel back in time to the Regency period, what would you do? Where would you

go? Who would you seek out?

First of all, I’d disguise myself as a man. Ladies had better clothes but not enough

freedom of movement for my taste. Since I’ll still sound like a modern American, I’ll

study with an local acting teacher first to try to blend in. Once I feel comfortable there,

I’ll do a tour of the continent. In particular, I’d like to see the shadow puppeteer Seraphin

in Paris.

4. Did working with Shimmer and getting a behind the scenes look at how

a magazine comes together impact your approach to your own fiction?

Absolutely. Reading slush helped me understand what editors mean when they say things

like a story “doesn’t rise above.” There are a lot of stories that are unflawed but also not

doing anything more than telling a competent story. It’s still an elusive idea, but time

reading the slush pile definitely helped with that.

5. Puppetry, travel, vice president of the SFWA…how do you balance everything you

do and still make time for writing?

Honestly? Structured procrastination. It’s much easier to justify putting something off

if there’s another thing that is more pressing. If you manage them right, generally it’s

possible to use the urge to flee to get everything done.

6. Finish the sentence: “I wish I could _____.”

I wish I could take a nap, now.

7. What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve been given? Alternatively, what’s

the worst?

Kristine Kathryn Rusch said that the manuscript is the tool with which you are telling

the story in your head. Sometimes, you’ve picked the wrong tool. The problem is with

the manuscript and it is not a precious thing. The worst advice was to put all five senses

on every single page. I wound up with a story that was incomprehensible and put my

instructor, who’d told me to do that, to sleep.

8. What favorite book do you wish you could forget, so you could have the pleasure

of reading it for the first time again?

The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell.

9. What was the most frustrating thing about writing Shades of Milk and Honey?

When I realized that the plot had taken a wrong turn and that I’d need to throw out 20,000

words. Bear in mind that I’m an outliner, and yet still. I needed to toss those chapters and

re-outline based on what I was discovering as I was writing.

10. What do you know now that you didn’t know before the writing and

publication of Shades of Milk and Honey?

The word “check” only means “stop” in 1814. So it wouldn’t be used in the sense of “I

shall check on the strawberries” since that would mean “I will stop the strawberries.”

11. Among your collection, which is your favorite typewriter? Or, is there one out

there that you love but haven’t yet been able to acquire?

I have a Duotone Royal that has a sans serif font. It’s a beautiful maroon and black

machine. The one that I’m still looking for is the typewriter I let get away. It was a

Corona #3, folding typewriter, in Oxblood red.

12. Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility?

Sense and Sensibility

13. When can readers expect Glamour in Glass to hit shelves? Any sneak peeks?

It comes out in early 2012. Here are the opening lines, “There are few things in this

world which can simultaneously delight and dismay in the same manner as a formal

dinner party. Finding oneself a guest of honour, only increases the presentiment of

unease, should one be disposed to such feelings.”

Mary Robinette Kowal, Art Director Emeritus for Shimmer, is never still for very long.

She works as a professional puppeteer and voice actor, is the Vice President of Science

Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and now has her first novel gracing bookstore

shelves everywhere. Mary took time out of her busy schedule to talk with Shimmer about

that new novel, Shades of Milk and Honey.

If you would like to catch the author and her novel in person, look for her at:

KGB Bar Fantastic Fiction, 85 E. 4th Street, New York, NY, 10003: Wednesday

August 18th, 7-8pm. SF IN SF AT VARIETY THEATER 582 Market Street @

Montgomery (1st floor of The Hobart Bldg), San Francisco, CA 94104: Saturday August

21st, 6-7pm. Tsunami Books 2585 Willamette St. Eugene, OR 97405: Tuesday August

24th, 5-6pm.

13 Lucky Questions with Mary Robinette Kowal

by E. Catherine Tobler

1. Shades of Milk and Honey has been described as Pride and Prejudice with magic.

What drew you to the Regency timeframe?

I love Jane Austen and at the time I was reading Persuasion. I wondered why no one was

writing these intimate family dramas in fantasy.

2. Can you explain some about the process of selling your first book? Was this the

first book you wrote and tried to sell?

This is the fourth book I’ve written and the second one I’ve tried to sell. Mostly it

involves a lot of waiting. I got very lucky and have a wonderful agent who does all the

hard work of actually sending it out. With the first novel, I was sending it to publishers

on my own and that takes forever.

3. One of your short stories (“First Flight”) involves a time machine. If you could

travel back in time to the Regency period, what would you do? Where would you

go? Who would you seek out?

First of all, I’d disguise myself as a man. Ladies had better clothes but not enough

freedom of movement for my taste. Since I’ll still sound like a modern American, I’ll

study with an local acting teacher first to try to blend in. Once I feel comfortable there,

I’ll do a tour of the continent. In particular, I’d like to see the shadow puppeteer Seraphin

in Paris.

4. Did working with Shimmer and getting a behind the scenes look at how

a magazine comes together impact your approach to your own fiction?

Absolutely. Reading slush helped me understand what editors mean when they say things

like a story “doesn’t rise above.” There are a lot of stories that are unflawed but also not

doing anything more than telling a competent story. It’s still an elusive idea, but time

reading the slush pile definitely helped with that.

5. Puppetry, travel, vice president of the SFWA…how do you balance everything you

do and still make time for writing?

Honestly? Structured procrastination. It’s much easier to justify putting something off

if there’s another thing that is more pressing. If you manage them right, generally it’s

possible to use the urge to flee to get everything done.

6. Finish the sentence: “I wish I could _____.”

I wish I could take a nap, now.

7. What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve been given? Alternatively, what’s

the worst?

Kristine Kathryn Rusch said that the manuscript is the tool with which you are telling

the story in your head. Sometimes, you’ve picked the wrong tool. The problem is with

the manuscript and it is not a precious thing. The worst advice was to put all five senses

on every single page. I wound up with a story that was incomprehensible and put my

instructor, who’d told me to do that, to sleep.

8. What favorite book do you wish you could forget, so you could have the pleasure

of reading it for the first time again?

The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell.

9. What was the most frustrating thing about writing Shades of Milk and Honey?

When I realized that the plot had taken a wrong turn and that I’d need to throw out 20,000

words. Bear in mind that I’m an outliner, and yet still. I needed to toss those chapters and

re-outline based on what I was discovering as I was writing.

10. What do you know now that you didn’t know before the writing and

publication of Shades of Milk and Honey?

The word “check” only means “stop” in 1814. So it wouldn’t be used in the sense of “I

shall check on the strawberries” since that would mean “I will stop the strawberries.”

11. Among your collection, which is your favorite typewriter? Or, is there one out

there that you love but haven’t yet been able to acquire?

I have a Duotone Royal that has a sans serif font. It’s a beautiful maroon and black

machine. The one that I’m still looking for is the typewriter I let get away. It was a

Corona #3, folding typewriter, in Oxblood red.

12. Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility?

Sense and Sensibility

13. When can readers expect Glamour in Glass to hit shelves? Any sneak peeks?

It comes out in early 2012. Here are the opening lines, “There are few things in this

world which can simultaneously delight and dismay in the same manner as a formal

dinner party. Finding oneself a guest of honour, only increases the presentiment of

unease, should one be disposed to such feelings.”

Mary Robinette Kowal, Art Director Emeritus for Shimmer, is never still for very long.
She works as a professional puppeteer and voice actor, is the Vice President of Science
Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and now has her first novel gracing bookstore
shelves everywhere. Mary took time out of her busy schedule to talk with Shimmer about
that new novel, Shades of Milk and Honey.

If you would like to catch the author and her novel in person, look for her at:

KGB Bar Fantastic Fiction, 85 E. 4th Street, New York, NY, 10003: Wednesday
August 18th, 7-8pm. SF IN SF AT VARIETY THEATER 582 Market Street @
Montgomery (1st floor of The Hobart Bldg), San Francisco, CA 94104: Saturday August
21st, 6-7pm. Tsunami Books 2585 Willamette St. Eugene, OR 97405: Tuesday August
24th, 5-6pm.

13 Lucky Questions with Mary Robinette Kowal
by E. Catherine Tobler

1. Shades of Milk and Honey has been described as Pride and Prejudice with magic.
What drew you to the Regency timeframe?
I love Jane Austen and at the time I was reading Persuasion. I wondered why no one was
writing these intimate family dramas in fantasy.

2. Can you explain some about the process of selling your first book? Was this the
first book you wrote and tried to sell?
This is the fourth book I’ve written and the second one I’ve tried to sell. Mostly it
involves a lot of waiting. I got very lucky and have a wonderful agent who does all the
hard work of actually sending it out. With the first novel, I was sending it to publishers
on my own and that takes forever.

3. One of your short stories (“First Flight”) involves a time machine. If you could
travel back in time to the Regency period, what would you do? Where would you
go? Who would you seek out?
First of all, I’d disguise myself as a man. Ladies had better clothes but not enough
freedom of movement for my taste. Since I’ll still sound like a modern American, I’ll
study with an local acting teacher first to try to blend in. Once I feel comfortable there,
I’ll do a tour of the continent. In particular, I’d like to see the shadow puppeteer Seraphin
in Paris.

4. Did working with Shimmer and getting a behind the scenes look at how
a magazine comes together impact your approach to your own fiction?
Absolutely. Reading slush helped me understand what editors mean when they say things
like a story “doesn’t rise above.” There are a lot of stories that are unflawed but also not
doing anything more than telling a competent story. It’s still an elusive idea, but time
reading the slush pile definitely helped with that.

5. Puppetry, travel, vice president of the SFWA…how do you balance everything you
do and still make time for writing?
Honestly? Structured procrastination. It’s much easier to justify putting something off
if there’s another thing that is more pressing. If you manage them right, generally it’s
possible to use the urge to flee to get everything done.

6. Finish the sentence: “I wish I could _____.”
I wish I could take a nap, now.

7. What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve been given? Alternatively, what’s
the worst?
Kristine Kathryn Rusch said that the manuscript is the tool with which you are telling
the story in your head. Sometimes, you’ve picked the wrong tool. The problem is with
the manuscript and it is not a precious thing. The worst advice was to put all five senses
on every single page. I wound up with a story that was incomprehensible and put my
instructor, who’d told me to do that, to sleep.

8. What favorite book do you wish you could forget, so you could have the pleasure
of reading it for the first time again?
The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell.

9. What was the most frustrating thing about writing Shades of Milk and Honey?
When I realized that the plot had taken a wrong turn and that I’d need to throw out 20,000
words. Bear in mind that I’m an outliner, and yet still. I needed to toss those chapters and
re-outline based on what I was discovering as I was writing.

10. What do you know now that you didn’t know before the writing and
publication of Shades of Milk and Honey?
The word “check” only means “stop” in 1814. So it wouldn’t be used in the sense of “I
shall check on the strawberries” since that would mean “I will stop the strawberries.”

11. Among your collection, which is your favorite typewriter? Or, is there one out
there that you love but haven’t yet been able to acquire?
I have a Duotone Royal that has a sans serif font. It’s a beautiful maroon and black
machine. The one that I’m still looking for is the typewriter I let get away. It was a
Corona #3, folding typewriter, in Oxblood red.

12. Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility?
Sense and Sensibility

13. When can readers expect Glamour in Glass to hit shelves? Any sneak peeks?
It comes out in early 2012. Here are the opening lines, “There are few things in this
world which can simultaneously delight and dismay in the same manner as a formal
dinner party. Finding oneself a guest of honour, only increases the presentiment of
unease, should one be disposed to such feelings.”Mary Robinette Kowal, Art Director Emeritus for Shimmer, is never still for very long.

She works as a professional puppeteer and voice actor, is the Vice President of Science

Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and now has her first novel gracing bookstore

shelves everywhere. Mary took time out of her busy schedule to talk with Shimmer about

that new novel, Shades of Milk and Honey.

If you would like to catch the author and her novel in person, look for her at:

KGB Bar Fantastic Fiction, 85 E. 4th Street, New York, NY, 10003: Wednesday

August 18th, 7-8pm. SF IN SF AT VARIETY THEATER 582 Market Street @

Montgomery (1st floor of The Hobart Bldg), San Francisco, CA 94104: Saturday August

21st, 6-7pm. Tsunami Books 2585 Willamette St. Eugene, OR 97405: Tuesday August

24th, 5-6pm.

13 Lucky Questions with Mary Robinette Kowal

by E. Catherine Tobler

1. Shades of Milk and Honey has been described as Pride and Prejudice with magic.

What drew you to the Regency timeframe?

I love Jane Austen and at the time I was reading Persuasion. I wondered why no one was

writing these intimate family dramas in fantasy.

2. Can you explain some about the process of selling your first book? Was this the

first book you wrote and tried to sell?

This is the fourth book I’ve written and the second one I’ve tried to sell. Mostly it

involves a lot of waiting. I got very lucky and have a wonderful agent who does all the

hard work of actually sending it out. With the first novel, I was sending it to publishers

on my own and that takes forever.

3. One of your short stories (“First Flight”) involves a time machine. If you could

travel back in time to the Regency period, what would you do? Where would you

go? Who would you seek out?

First of all, I’d disguise myself as a man. Ladies had better clothes but not enough

freedom of movement for my taste. Since I’ll still sound like a modern American, I’ll

study with an local acting teacher first to try to blend in. Once I feel comfortable there,

I’ll do a tour of the continent. In particular, I’d like to see the shadow puppeteer Seraphin

in Paris.

4. Did working with Shimmer and getting a behind the scenes look at how

a magazine comes together impact your approach to your own fiction?

Absolutely. Reading slush helped me understand what editors mean when they say things

like a story “doesn’t rise above.” There are a lot of stories that are unflawed but also not

doing anything more than telling a competent story. It’s still an elusive idea, but time

reading the slush pile definitely helped with that.

5. Puppetry, travel, vice president of the SFWA…how do you balance everything you

do and still make time for writing?

Honestly? Structured procrastination. It’s much easier to justify putting something off

if there’s another thing that is more pressing. If you manage them right, generally it’s

possible to use the urge to flee to get everything done.

6. Finish the sentence: “I wish I could _____.”

I wish I could take a nap, now.

7. What is the best piece of writing advice you’ve been given? Alternatively, what’s

the worst?

Kristine Kathryn Rusch said that the manuscript is the tool with which you are telling

the story in your head. Sometimes, you’ve picked the wrong tool. The problem is with

the manuscript and it is not a precious thing. The worst advice was to put all five senses

on every single page. I wound up with a story that was incomprehensible and put my

instructor, who’d told me to do that, to sleep.

8. What favorite book do you wish you could forget, so you could have the pleasure

of reading it for the first time again?

The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell.

9. What was the most frustrating thing about writing Shades of Milk and Honey?

When I realized that the plot had taken a wrong turn and that I’d need to throw out 20,000

words. Bear in mind that I’m an outliner, and yet still. I needed to toss those chapters and

re-outline based on what I was discovering as I was writing.

10. What do you know now that you didn’t know before the writing and

publication of Shades of Milk and Honey?

The word “check” only means “stop” in 1814. So it wouldn’t be used in the sense of “I

shall check on the strawberries” since that would mean “I will stop the strawberries.”

11. Among your collection, which is your favorite typewriter? Or, is there one out

there that you love but haven’t yet been able to acquire?

I have a Duotone Royal that has a sans serif font. It’s a beautiful maroon and black

machine. The one that I’m still looking for is the typewriter I let get away. It was a

Corona #3, folding typewriter, in Oxblood red.

12. Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility?

Sense and Sensibility

13. When can readers expect Glamour in Glass to hit shelves? Any sneak peeks?

It comes out in early 2012. Here are the opening lines, “There are few things in this

world which can simultaneously delight and dismay in the same manner as a formal

dinner party. Finding oneself a guest of honour, only increases the presentiment of

unease, should one be disposed to such feelings.”

Author Spotlight: Amal El-Mohtar

Amal El-Mohtar
Amal El-Mohtar

This week’s treat: Amal El-Mohtar reads her Clockwork Jungle Book story “The Fishbowl,” a story of oracular fish. I love the imagery in this story; and it doesn’t hurt that no one else wrote about fish!

Amal’s stories have appeared in Shimmer twice before: Sparrow and Egg in Issue #6 (read our interview with her!), and The Crow’s Caw in Issue #4 (read our other interview!). Since then, she’s launched online poetry ‘zine Goblin Fruit, won a Rhysling, and recently had stories in Strange Horizons and Cabinet des Fees. It’s a delight to see her name in our pages again!

Click here to listen (11mb, MP3 format)

Want to read the rest of the issue? We’ve got 19 more fantastic stories!

Author Spotlight: Jay Lake

Jay Lake. Photo © Roger Podva
Jay Lake. Photo © Roger Podva

We couldn’t very well have a clockwork issue without Jay Lake in it, could we? Jay wrote a terrific origin story for us, so we’re kicking off our Clockwork Jungle Book Author Spotlight series with his reading of “Shedding Skin.”

Click hear to hear Jay read from his story “Shedding Skin” (12mb, mp3 format)

Jay’s story “The Black Back-Lands” appeared in our second issue. Check out his web site for the numerous other places you can find his novels and short stories!
Continue reading Author Spotlight: Jay Lake

Spotlight On: Alex Wilson

Alex Wilson
Alex Wilson

Here’s a special treat: a video of Alex Wilson reading part of his story, The Spoils of Springfield, from Issue 10.

I love this story for its insightful social commentary and gruesomeness. Also, it cracks me up. Alex’s reading does a lovely job of conveying all those elements.

Want to read the rest of the story? Grab your copy of Issue 10 today, either in the free electronic version, or a sleek print copy.

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Spotlight on: Silvia Moreno-Garcia

This week’s treat: Silvia Moreno-Garcia reads from her story “Jaguar Woman,” in both English and Spanish, and talks about language.

Click here to hear Silvia!

Want more Silvia? Check out her blog, and her new venture, the Innsmouth Free Press, a fictional newspaper publishing faux news pieces in a Lovecraftian/Cthulhu Mythos universe, as well as original short fiction stories.

We’ve made Issue 10 available for free: download yours today, or consider a subscription.